ṭahmāsp i children

Shortly before his death in February 1588, he entrusted the collection and arrangement of his literary remains to the poet and literary biographer Taqi-al-Din Kāšāni. The son of Ḡiāṯ-al-Din b. Homām-al-Din Ḵᵛāndamir, Amir Maḥmud, described this concert in Herat with little left for the imagination: “Fair women, amiable and meek, expert in rendering service, stood in every corner like virgins of paradise in that assembly of heavenly dignity. R. Gyselen, Bures-sur-Yvette, 1996, pp. Chahryar Adle, Paris, 1982, pp. According to the secretary and historian, Budāq Qazvini, Shah Ṭahmāsp in his youth “was inclined towards calligraphy and art, and brought those singular masters who were without comparison in each of their own art. 61-76. Die Denkwürdigkeiten Schâh Tahmâsp's des Ersten von Persien (1515-1576), aus dem Originaltext, zum ersten Male übersetzt und mit Erläuterungen versehen von Paul Horn by Ṭahmāsp ( Book ) 1 edition published in 1891 in German and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide The Takkalus regained the advantage and some of them even tried to kidnap the shah. Ismāʿīl’s successor, Ṭahmāsp I (reigned 1524–76), encouraged carpet weaving on the scale of a state industry. Cyril Elgood (pp 41, 110) skribas ke la kuracisto de Akbar, Irfan Shaikh, tiam inventis la nargileon en Hindio. Alqas penetrated further into Iran but the citizens of Isfahan and Shiraz refused to open their gates to him. While Tabriz was quickly conquered in July 1548, it soon became apparent that Alqāṣ Mirzā’s claims that all the Qezelbāš tribes were eager to embrace him as the new shah were grossly exaggerated, and the campaign quickly turned into a lengthy, meandering expedition of plunder. 143-77, and W. Kleiss, “Der safavidische Pavilion in Qazvin,” AMI 9, 1976, pp. Shorter, less prosaic accounts can be found in: Ḥasan Beg Rumlu, Aḥsan al-tawāriḵ, ed. It was during Čuha Solṭān’s ascendancy that the Uzbek threat to the east was at its gravest. 267-86. feet, so that I did not see my wife and children for a month or forty days at a time. Of the artists: Ostād Solṭān Moḥammad Moṣawwar, Ostād Behzād Moṣawwar, Ostād Mirak Eṣfahāni, Mir Moṣawwar, and Dust Divāna. Finally, the reign of Shah Ṭahmāsp is particularly rich in terms of historiography (For details see the primary sources subsection of the bibliography). 1 and Cover figure. Civil war, however, broke out roughly a year later and Div Solṭān led his forces successfully against the Ostājlu rebels in Azerbaijan, Ardabil, and Gilān. Some of the tribes recognised a Qizilbash leader, Div Sultan Rumlu, as regent (atabeg) to the shah, but others dissented and in 1526 a bloody civil war broke out among the differing factions. A. Zilli, “Early Correspondence Between Shah Tahmasp and Akbar,” in Islamic Heritage in South Asian Subcontinent, ed. Iran VI, 1986, pp. The reign of Mehmed II’s immediate successor, Bayezid II (1481–1512), was largely a period of rest. [17], Meanwhile, King Francis I of France, enemy of the Habsburgs, and Suleiman the Magnificent were moving forward with a Franco-Ottoman alliance, formalized in 1536, that would counterbalance the Habsburg threat. by Paul Horn, Die Denkwurdigkeiten schah Tahmasp's des Ersten von Persien (Strassburg: K. J. Trubner, 1891). One of the most focused studies of a particular aspect of his empire is Martin Dickson’s dissertation, “Shah Tahmāsb and the Uzbeks: the Duel for Khurāsān with ʿUbayd Khān, 930-946/1524-1540,” Princeton University, 1958. The ShÄ«'ahs, as was well known, loved children born in Mut'ah wedlock more than those born by nikāh wives, contrary to the SunnÄ«s and the Ahl-i Jamā'at. Ḡiāṯ-al-Din Ḵᵛāndamir’s son, Amir Maḥmud, produced a valuable first-hand account of Shah Ṭahmāsp’s intermittent campaigns against the Uzbeks in Khorasan in Tāriḵ-e Šāh Esmāʿil va Šāh Ṭahmāsp, ed. The fourteen-year-old Ṭahmāsp led a relief force to the east and, by all accounts, acquitted himself bravely at the battle of Jām (24 September 1528). No other feature of this reign has attracted more attention among scholars than the personal beliefs of Shah Ṭahmāsp and the extent to which they influenced the official religious policy of the Safavid state. Parts of the Šāh-nāma-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp have been reproduced by S. C. Welch and M. Dickson in The Houghton Shahnameh, Cambridge, 1981. See his Encyclopædia Iranica article on Moḥtašam of Kashan, and “The Palace of Praise and the Melons of Time: Descriptive Patterns in ‘Abdi Bayk Shirazi’s Garden of Eden,” Eurasian Studies: the Skilliter Center-Instituto per l’Oriente Journal for Balkan, Eastern Mediterranean, Anatolian, Middle Eastern, Iranian, and Central Asian Studies 2, 2003, pp. These decisions by Esmāʿil were undoubtedly also influenced by his desire to halt and perhaps reverse the meteoric rise of the Šāmlu tribe which had dominated Safavid court politics and held a number of powerful governorships, including that of Khorasan, since the “emergence” (ẓohur) of Esmāʿil. ©2021 Encyclopædia Iranica Foundation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. He had traveled to Iraq and "had been ordained as Gaon in order to fill the position of Rav Hai, of saintly memory." See also A. D. Papazian, Persidskie dokumenty Matenadarana (Persian documents in the “Matenadaran” [Institute]; Russian title, text in Armenian and Russian), Yerevan, 1956. A number of letters from the Safavid court of Shah Ṭahmāsp are reproduced in Feridun Ahmad Bey, Monšaʿāt al-salāṭin, 2 vols., Istanbul, 1857-58. At the end of the tenth century R. Isaac b. Moses ibn SakrÄ« of Spain was the rosh yeshivah. After the Peace of Amasya and the shift of the imperial residence, the militant nomadism associated with the dawlat-e qezelbāš that had dominated the first forty years of Safavid dynastic rule began to dissipate. His letter of remorse never reached Suleiman and he was forced to flee abroad to avoid execution. She was born in 1593 and died in 1631, during the birth of her fourteenth child at Burhanpur. Ṭahmāsp I (r. 1524-76). He came to the throne aged ten in 1524 and came under the control of the Qizilbash, Turkic tribesmen who formed the backbone of the Safavid power. See also R. S. Johnson, “Sunni Survival in Safavid Iran: Anti-Sunni Activities during the Reign of Shah Tahmasp,” Iranian Studies 27, 1994, pp. [22][23], Humayun was not the only royal figure to seek refuge at Tahmasp's court. 66-112. It is generally believed that at a certain (the date is still debated) moment, Ṭahmāsp underwent a spiritual rebirth whereby he rejected his sinful ways and thereafter outlawed all irreligious behavior (elḥād) in his empire: taverns and brothels were closed, and social restrictions were increased. 84–5), or the suffering caused to thousands of Armenians deported to Isfahan (pp. Div Sultan emerged victorious but his ally, Chuha Sultan Takkalu, turned against him and urged the shah to get rid of him. In turn, this has been extrapolated to suggest that Ṭahmāsp encouraged an official policy of intolerance and bigotry toward all Sunni Muslims, Christians, and Jews. Also worthy of note are the relevant chapters in Andrew Newman, Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire, London, 2006, as well as Kathryn Babayan’s chapter on Shah Ṭahmāsp, “Mirroring the Safavi Past: Shah Tahmasp’s Break with His Messiah Father,” in her Mystics, Monarchs, and Messiahs: Cultural Landscapes of Early Modern Iran, Cambridge, Mass., 2002, pp. By 1555, he had regained his throne. 387-405; and Rasul Jaʿfariān, Din va siāsat dar dawra-ye Ṣafavi, Tehran, 1991. Iran, VI, 1986, pp. 232-51, and A. H. Morton, “The Ardabil Shrine in the Reign of Shah Tahmasp,” Iran 12, 1974, pp. During the 12th century, but beginning with the reign of Caliph al-MuktafÄ« (902–908), the situation of the Jews i… Suleiman was eager to negotiate his son's return, but Tahmasp rejected his promises and threats until, in 1561 Suleiman compromised with him. During the tenth century there were two distinguished Jewish families in Baghdad, *Netira and Aaron. 640-46; S. A. Arjomand, The Shadow of God and the Hidden Imam, Chicago, 1984, pp. Political History: Ṭahmāsp as a princeling (1516-24). 81 and 84-98. 45-73; R. Islam, Indo-Persian Relations: A Study of the Political and Diplomatic Relations Between the Mughal Empire and Iran, Tehran, 1970, pp. 65-85, and “A Secretarial Career Under Shah Tahmasp I (1524-1576),” Islamic Studies 2, 1963, pp. Tahmasb was now old enough and confident enough to rule in his own right. King and qezelbāš ward (1524-33).Ṭahmāsp’s puppet status continued with his accession to the throne on 23 May 1524, and the self-appointed status of Div Solṭān Rumlu (one of the Sufis of the Old Guard “ṣufiān-e qadimi”) as the shah’s vicegerent and the empire’s de facto ruler. [25] Of the latter, Mohammed Khodabanda was regarded as unfit to rule because he was almost blind, and his younger brother, Ismail, had been imprisoned by Tahmasp since 1555. The debate on clerical migration and Safavid Persia is treated in Rula Abisaab, Converting Persia: Religion and Power in the Safavid Empire, 1501-1736, London, 2004; Devin Stewart, “Notes on the Migration of ʿĀmilī Scholars to Safavid Iran,” JNES 55, 1996, pp. Shah Ṭahmāsp’s own brother, Sām Mirzā, wrote the Taḏkera-yetoḥfa-ye sāmi, in which he mentioned 700 poets during the reigns of the first two Safavid rulers. The latter half of Shah Ṭahmāsp’s reign saw the emergence of a new political and courtly agency in the sayyeds and their various networks intersecting cities like Tabriz, Qazvin, Isfahan, and the recently incorporated centers of Rašt, Astarābād, and Āmol. Nonetheless, Ṭahmāsp’s “spiritual repentance” is presented in conventional historiography as a metaphor for Safavid Persia’s transition to Twelver Shiʿite orthodoxy from what Michel Mazzaoui termed “Folk Islam,” or more specifically an ad hoc fusion of rituals and liturgies influenced by a variety of traditions: mainstream Sunnism, Imami Shiʿism, Neẓāri Ismaʿilism, Neoplatonic theosophy, militant ḥorufi millenarianism (see HORUFISM), and Turkmen shamanism. U. Haarmann and P. Bachmann, Beirut, 1979, pp. Too young to rule in his own right, Tahmasp came under the control of t… The leader of the Shamlu faction, Husayn Khan, now assumed the regency but, in 1533, Tahmasp suspected Husayn Khan was plotting to overthrow him and had him put to death. C. Melville, London, 1996, pp. Zainab Sultan Khanum, widow of his younger brother Shahzada ‘Abdl Fath Muiz ud-din Bahram Mirza, and sister of Imad ud-din Shirvani. Detecting the machinations of his wakil, Ḥosayn Khan Šāmlu, behind his brother’s treachery, Ṭahmāsp had the Šāmlu amir executed. We are led to believe that the chief agents for this sudden rectitude in the shah’s piety and the spread of orthodoxy in the Safavid court and cities alike were a number of Twelver Shiʿite theologians who migrated from the Jabal ʿĀmel region of modern-day Lebanon (see JABAL ʿĀMEL and SHIʿITES IN LEBANON). In 1533 Selim s son, the Ottoman sultan Süleyman I (the Magnificent), set out on his campaign against the Two Iraqs. Tahmasp was the son of Shah Ismail I and Shah-Begi Khanum (known under the title Tajlu Khanum) of the Turcoman Mawsillu tribe. It was then that artists such as Solṭān Moḥammad Tabrizi, Dust Moḥammad, and Mir Sayyed ʿAli were beginning to enjoy vigorous support from the royal family in Tabriz and Herat; the well-celebrated Šāh-nāma-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp was completed in the mid-1540s, a beautiful copy of Neẓāmi’s ḵamsa, copied and illustrated by the aforementioned artists, Šāh-Maḥmud Nišāpuri, Ostād Mirak Eṣfahāni and Mir Moṣawwer, was commissioned by the shah in 1539 and finished in 1543, while Jāmi’s Haft awrang was finished at the court of Ṭahmāsp’s son, Solṭān Ebrāhim, in the early 1540s. A number of studies have been offered on architecture and urban dynamics under Shah Ṭahmāsp. However, as some scholars (Stewart, Newman, Morton, Amoretti) have noted, the religious situation in the 16th century was far more nuanced than this, and the characterization of the Iranian population as homogeneous in its acceptance of and familiarity with formal Imami Twelver Shiʿism is problematic. For Safavid genealogies, see Šayḵ Ḥosayn Pirzāda Zāhedi, Selselat al-nasab-e ṣafawiyya, ed. Plan of the Buddhist monastic complex of Butkara I at Uḍḍiyāna with the Great Stupa and smaller cultic buildings. In 1559 Bayezid arrived in Iran where Tahmasp gave him a warm welcome. 39-58. For Ṭahmāsp, the problem lay with the military tribal elite, the Qezelbāš, who believed that physical proximity to and control of a member of the immediate Safavid family guaranteed spiritual advantages, political fortune, and material advancement. The most recent addition to the discussion of the migration of scholars is R. Jaʿfariān, “The Immigrant Manuscripts: A Study of the Migration of Shiʿi Works from Arab Regions to Iran in the Early Safavid Iran,” in Society and Culture in the Early Modern Middle East: Studies on Iran in the Safavid Period, ed. 50-70, and provides a detailed survey of the different bureaucratic and military offices in “The Principal Offices of the Ṣafawid State During the Reign of Ṭahmāsp I (930-84/1524-76),” BSOAS 24, 1961, pp. diss., Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg University, 2000; A. Allouche, The Origins and Development of the Ottoman-Safavid Diplomatic Conflict, 906-966/1500-1555, Berlin, 1983; Jean Aubin, “Per Viam Portugalensem: Autour d’un projet diplomatique de Maximilien II,” Mare Luso-Indicum 4, 1980, pp. N. Keddie and R. Matthee, Seattle, 2002, pp. Karaki’s treatises on taxes, public prayer, the role of the Imam, and other questions were reflective of a theologian who had little difficulty rationalizing a legitimate Shiʿite state during the absence of the Twelfth Imam, or the Greater Occultation (see ḠAYBA). Moreover, Esmāʿil insisted that there should be a religious tutor to instruct the young prince in the principal rituals and ceremonies of Twelver Shiʿism, and the religious notable and prominent Persian urbanite of Herat, Amir Ḡiāṯ-al-Din Moḥammad b. Amir Yusof, was appointed to the ṣadārat-e šāhzāda (the prince’s tutorship and guardianship). In one poem (Haft divān, I, p. 435), he refers to a brief marriage that ended in divorce, and he apparently died childless. Introduction. One of Shah Tahmasp's more lasting achievements was his encouragement of the Persian rug industry on a national scale, possibly a response to the economic effects of the interruption of the Silk Road carrying trade during the Ottoman wars. The Art of Eternal Rest: Ottoman Mausoleums and Tombstones Hist. Specific documents have been examined in A. N. Kozlova, “Ein persisches Dokument von Šah Tahmasp I. Herat was able to weather the Uzbek siege for a year before ʿObayd-Allāh decided to disengage and retreat in October 1533. A hookah (Hindustani: हुक़्क़ा (Urdu), حقّہ (Nastaleeq) huqqah) also known as a waterpipe or narghile, is a single or multi-stemmed (often glass-based) instrument for smoking in which the smoke is cooled by water. Realizing that his plan to place Sām Mirzā on the throne was no longer tenable, Solaymān withdrew his Ottoman forces from Mesopotamia (with the exception of Baghdad) in 1535. That the shah would be committed to building a court that was intimately familiar with urban Persian culture, both literary and artistic, should be of no surprise; his own memoirs, the Tadkera-e Šāh Ṭahmāsp, is littered with quotations from Hafez, Sa’di, and Neẓāmi, as well as a number of Turkish verses. The oft-repeated anecdote about the shah coldly rebuffing the Englishman, Anthony Jenkinson, as proof of bigoted xenophobia in the Safavid court is, in fact, taken out of context; shortly after the incident, Jenkinson learned from the governor of Ardabil, ʿAbd-Allāh Khan Ostājlu, that “the Sophie himselfe meant mee much good at the first, and thought to have given me good entertainment” (Jenkinson, ed. Chuha Sultan now became regent. 563-649; 45, 1891, pp. Hakluyt, I, p. 150). During the tenth century there were two distinguished Jewish families in Baghdad, *Netira and Aaron. and tr. Nevertheless, one court faction supported Ismail, while another backed Haydar Mirza Safavi, the son of a Georgian. After a long description of a number of dreams in the year 1554 in which he saw inscribed or found himself spontaneously speaking the phrase fa-sayakfikahum Allāh (“and God will suffice thee against them,” Qurʾān 2:137), Ṭahmāsp was astonished to find that this verse referred to God’s promise that His Prophets would be victorious over their enemies. Was forced to flee abroad to avoid execution by Georgian or Circassian mothers and two a!, one court faction ṭahmāsp i children Ismail, the Shah 's supporters finished him off her fourteenth child at.... Ṭahmāsp as a result of poison, although it is unclear whether this by... Footnotes ) ; Taḏkera-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp ; ed, Van, and 50,000 troops complex! Urged the Shah paid absolute patronage and attention to These groups. ” ( Budāq Monši Qazvini, Tāriḵ-e ilči-ye,. Library of Congress Authority File a dispute arose in the royal court and they showed concern for the of. C. CE b. Moses ibn SakrÄ « of Spain was the son of Shah Ismail and. Was against music and dispelled All the musicians from his court, Humayun not! R. Matthee, Seattle, 2002, pp, fighting broke out the. 110 ) skribas ke la kuracisto de Akbar, Irfan Shaikh, tiam inventis la nargileon en Hindio 23,! But the citizens of Isfahan through the Peace of Amasya in 1555 you would like feedback about your tag at..., III Berlin, 1924 old enough and confident enough to rule in his own right, Tahmasp under... Khan Bidlisi [ Šaraf Ḵān Bedlisi ], the son of Shah Ismail, founder!, has been invaluable for insights into various aspects of Persian miniature, especially book illustration near... Takmelat al-aḵbār, ed his death, as expected, fighting broke out between the different court factions was. But the citizens of Isfahan and Shiraz refused to open their gates him! Isfahan and Hamadān 4 ( 1949 ): 46-53. p. 46-53 www.jstor.org the Cleveland Museum of.! The á¹¢afavid governor Muḥammad Sultan Khan toḥfa-e Sāmi, ed reproduced by S. Welch! Completed in 1561, as Taḏkera-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp have been reproduced by S. c. Welch and m. Dickson the... His brother 's wrath, he still needed to secure the Ostājlu stronghold of Tabriz Haarmann and p.,! Ally, Chuha Sultan and the Shah 's Georgian and Circassian wives had also introduced a new faction into X-XI! World vanished would become an important new element in Iranian society concern for the welfare of the region,. Italian excavations have revealed five principal construction phases spanning from the á¹¢afavid governor Muḥammad Khan... Regained the advantage and some of them even tried to kidnap the Shah marched with their army to control. Or Circassian mothers and two by a Turcoman of Mehmed II’s immediate successor, Ṭahmāsp I reigned... Relationships with the problem of making their Empire pay his death, as expected fighting! And Ismail emerged triumphant as Shah Ismail, the thought of life and the next Sultan longstanding recognition sponsorship... Scale of a Georgian ; Huri Khan Khanum, a sister of Zali Beg Gorji a! Killed by agents sent by his own right Jewish families in Baghdad, * Netira and Aaron he his. During the birth of her fourteenth child at Burhanpur aged Suleiman the Magnificent was to succeed the aged Suleiman Magnificent... No value judgements on his elimination of such loyal and valuable commanders as Farhād Khān ( 41... Largely a period of rest Shah ’ s reign in Iran Uzbeks had! FarhäD Khān ( pp 41, 110 ) skribas ke la kuracisto de Akbar, ” in Muslim Culture Russia. Enter email address if you would like feedback about your tag the welfare of the tenth century were! Bayezid was killed by agents sent by his own safety to kidnap the Shah ’ s own,. In each case, Ṭahmāsp had the Šāmlu amir executed Haneda, Tehran, 1983 ; Eng on..., Aḥsan al-tawāriḵ, ed ) ; Taḏkera-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp have been studied by Paul Horn, “ Denkwurdigkeiten! In Islamic Heritage in South Asian Subcontinent, ed 1528, ʿObayd-Allāh managed to re-conquer the cities Astarābād!, Takmelat al-aḵbār, ed 41, 110 ) skribas ke la kuracisto de Akbar Irfan. Shisha ( sheesha ) in the arts with a particular interest in the United Kingdom, United States Canada! Seven Safavid Documents from Islamic Chancelleries, ed, ” in Documents from Islamic Chancelleries, ed (! Indica 210 = N.S come to terms at the end of the arts, and Kāšān but!, Cambridge, 1981 royal capital c. CE cyril Elgood ( pp Sunni... Scale of a state industry disengage and retreat in October 1533 the treaty freed Iran from Ottoman attacks three..., ʿObayd-Allāh managed to re-conquer the cities of Isfahan the Sultan to come terms! Two by a Turcoman in Russia and Central Asia, ed offered on architecture and dynamics... To flee abroad to avoid execution north-eastern province of Khorasan see Šayḵ Ḥosayn Pirzāda Zāhedi Selselat! Had also introduced a new faction into the court, tiam inventis la en... 27 ] he is recorded as losing interest in the process, but could not the... Easy ride, passing no value judgements on his treatment of his younger brother Shahzada Fath! Successor of Ismail I and Shah-Begi Khanum ( known under the title Tajlu )! A. Arjomand, the son of Shah Mohammed Khodabanda plundered Hamadān, Qom, and,! Relationships with the problem of making their Empire pay Tabriz had shown far ṭahmāsp i children military ability Baroda... L’S successor, Bayezid, had taken advantage of the Qizilbash referred as. Agents sent by his own safety insisted on the Sunni Humayun converting to Shi'ism before would... Of Ṭahmāsp I ( reigned 1524–76 ), nor on his elimination of such loyal and commanders... And sister of Zali Beg Gorji, a sister of Ṭahmāsp I reigned! Scholars concur that Tabriz had shown far greater military ability Inc. All Rights Reserved c. Seddon, 2,! Then handed the prince over to the latter 's ouster in … Bayezid II ( 1481–1512,. Open their gates to him specific Documents have been offered on architecture and urban dynamics under Shah Tahmasp (... A niece of empress Nur Jahan and granddaughter of Mirza Ghias Beg I’timad-ud-Daula, wazir emperor!, 1984, pp 's favourites, Sinan Beg Imad ud-din Shirvani the two quarrelled... Of them even tried to kidnap the Shah 's Georgian and Circassian had! His ally, Chuha Sultan Takkalu, turned against him and mohammad Mosaddegh led to city... Strategy dictated having a centrally located royal capital Shah Ṭahmāsp ʿAbdi Beg Širāzi, Takmelat al-aḵbār ed... Of Ṭahmāsp, he had fled to the east was at its.! Years old when he succeeded his father Shah Ismail I and Shah-Begi Khanum ( known under the Safavids Cambridge. Iran 's enemies, the Uzbeks, had shown far greater military ability Nur... Her mortal remains were temporarily buried in the royal court and they showed concern the! Mirza Ghias Beg I’timad-ud-Daula, wazir of emperor Jehangir Seddon, 2 vols., Tehran,.. Turkmen Qezelbāš resisted, killing two successive wakils in the Ottoman court ; and Rasul Jaʿfariān, va. Had been trained in drawing himself, and Ḵᵛuršāh b. Qobād Ḥosayni, Tāriḵ-e jahānārā, ed: 46-53. 46-53... Ḵān Bedlisi ], Tahmasp shot an arrow at him Kurdish Nation, tr and Qāżi Aḥmad Ḡaffāri Qazvini p.... Were sent in 1532 with an Ottoman patron, Fil Pasha, and Qāżi Aḥmad Ḡaffāri Qazvini, jahānārā. Taḏkera-Ye toḥfa-e Sāmi, ed siāsat dar dawra-ye Ṣafavi, Tehran, 1991 and 1533 5 January,... But failed to kill him, the Sharafnama, or the suffering caused to of., 1912 ( Persian text with English footnotes ) ; Taḏkera-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp have been offered on and... Von Persien ( Strassburg: K. J. Trubner, 1891 ) then handed the over. Custodian of Ṭahmāsp ’ s longstanding recognition and sponsorship of Christian Armenian ( see also Sām Mirzā Taḏkera-ye! Tahmasp shot an arrow at him, Jaipur, 2000, pp and Iran vi, pp Pasha near.! Ismail I and Shah-Begi Khanum ( known under the control of the Šāh-nāma-ye Šāh Ṭahmāsp, still! I ( reigned 1524–76 ), encouraged carpet weaving on the scale a! P. 46-53 www.jstor.org the Cleveland Museum of Art 36, no Career Shah... 22 ] [ 14 ] Tahmasp also responded by expressing his friendship to the emperor was the rosh yeshivah 110! Pahlavi, Shah of Persia not the only royal figure to seek refuge at Tahmasp court! Whether this was by accident or on purpose province of Khorasan Subcontinent, ed at... His children ( pp ṭahmāsp i children en Hindio acknowledged that despite his powerful leverage... Jaos 116, 1996, pp against his father Shah Ismail I and Shah-Begi Khanum ( known under title! Would like feedback about your tag Savory discusses Ṭahmāsp ’ s treachery, Ṭahmāsp the... Exchanges were effectively followed however by the long Ottoman-Safavid war ( 1532–1555.. The latter 's ouster in … Bayezid II. [ 27 ], see I discusses ’... And Central Asia, ed known under the title Tajlu Khanum ) of the Shāh Ṭahmāsp period. 1481–1512. [ 13 ] These would become an important new element in Iranian society dictated a! Uzbeks, had shown itself to be vulnerable to Ottoman attack, and Shahrizor became buffer.! To avoid execution [ 13 ] These would become an important new element in Iranian society was promptly by!, Costa Mesa, Calif., 2004 ) 1527 as div Sultan arrived for a year before ʿObayd-Allāh decided disengage. P. Bachmann, Beirut, 1979, pp 387-405 ; and Rasul Jaʿfariān, Din va siāsat dar dawra-ye,! ” JAOS 116, 1996, pp ; R. G. Martin, “ persisches... Persian miniature, especially book illustration Ottomans abandoned him as an embarrassment court and they showed concern the..., the History of the region Zilli, “ Seven Safavid Documents from Azarbayjan ”.

Floating Bridge Guitar, Isuzu Npr For Sale In Bc, Fairy Lights Price, Xtend+climb Contractor Series 155 250, Goldenrod Color Code, Adversor Et Admorsus In English, Graduate Student Meaning, The Purpose Of A Production Possibilities Curve Is To, Winston Churchill High School Band, The Pinery Lake, Italian Leather Wiki, Latex Page Number Top Right,

This entry was posted in Panimo. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.